Do “disabled people” fuck? And if so, how do they do it? And with whom? All of us, at one time or another, had these kind of doubts: maybe it’s because we all saw the film The Intouchables (Nakache & Toledano, 2011) or The Sessions (Lewin, 2012); or perhaps because we have this relative or that friend who had an accident; or even because one day we saw a person in a wheelchair and thought “Hey, not bad, he/she is attractive, but… Can he/she have sex?”

However, we all have silenced these doubts and felt embarrassed by having thoughts so unseemly, especially when referring to people considered “asexual”, “angels” or “eternal children”… But these questions are important because they address the alleged asexuality of people with functional diversity and challenge our cultural construction about the kind of bodies we believe are (in)valid for pleasure. Our sexual imagination is conditioned by advertising, media and pornography: all those industries bomb us with daily images of perfect bodies (young, beautiful, healthy) and tell us they are the only ones who have the right to have pleasure. Other bodies, all of those who don’t fit that narrowed standard (the big ones, the old ones, the “disabled” ones) are out of the picture. Or otherwise they go to the “bizarre” shelf of any other conventional pornography store.

We were so fed up with the invisibility and the taboo surrounding functional diverse people’s sexuality we decided to shot a critical and transgressive documentary film that would shake viewers’ consciences (and hormones too). And that was how Yes, we fuck! was born. In this documentary film you will discover stories about people who will never star in a fashion series but have so much to say about different (and dissident!) forms of dealing with their bodies and their sexuality. Our society has been denying the sexuality of these people or even considering it “wild” and “dangerous” and therefore repressing it. The documentary film seeks to counter this negative idea, shouting loud and clear “Yes, we DO fuck.” And if anyone still has doubts about that, Yes, we fuck! has explicit images of sex in which these people expose their privacy and nudity without any taboos. Its protagonists want to tell the world they are not ashamed of their bodies, or their partners, or their experiences. Not a bit! They are glad proud of it, as it’s them who eventually define their sexuality. As we all do, right?

When we talk about sex it immediately comes to our minds a stereotyped image: an attractive heterosexual couple, both young, practicing coitus, right? Yet, sex is more, so much more! It doesn’t end nor begins in heterosexuality, or youth, or whatever we mean by “attractive” or even on the genitals. In order to expand our sexual imagination, Yes, we fuck! reflects different types of practices and desires. One of the film’s stories tells about love between a woman in a wheelchair and her boyfriend. Other stories document sex not as a love bounding instrument but as monetary relationship: like the guy who pays for a prostitute or a woman who gets a sexual service assistance. There are also stories about sexual experimentation workshops in which people learn collectively about issues that are often unknown, such as female ejaculation or postporn.

In short, Yes, we fuck! is a documentary film that seeks not only to break taboos and stereotypes but it is also a battle cry. A battle cry for those who are tired of having to hide their bodies, tired of having to silence their desires, tired of having to deny their sexual pleasure… For real, who isn’t? Yes, we fuck! does not seek to “help” this “special” group of people but to make us think about our sexuality that may be so poor, or as rich as the so-called disabled’s one.

This post was originally written in Spanish. Click here for the original text.